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As always, there's no time like the present

Senior NCOs and officers from the 21st Space Wing discuss security measures and procedures with 21st Security Force Squadron members after a simulated explosion in the base auditorium March 15. The explosion was part of an emergency management exercise in which the wing’s ability to respond and react during emergency scenarios was evaluated. The EME was part of the wing’s Operational Readiness Inspection and Unit Compliance Inspection, which started Feb. 28 and concluded March 21. (U.S. Air Force photo/Craig Denton)

Senior NCOs and officers from the 21st Space Wing discuss security measures and procedures with 21st Security Force Squadron members after a simulated explosion in the base auditorium March 15. The explosion was part of an emergency management exercise in which the wing’s ability to respond and react during emergency scenarios was evaluated. The EME was part of the wing’s Operational Readiness Inspection and Unit Compliance Inspection, which started Feb. 28 and concluded March 21. (U.S. Air Force photo/Craig Denton)

PATRICK AFB, Fla. --       With the start of Spring this week, it's time for each of us to do some "tilling and planting" to we reap a successful crop of results when the Operational Readiness Inspection and Compliance Inspection happens later this year.
     Many of us have been through these before - but for those who haven't, maybe it's time we did a little Inspection 101-level classroom preparation.
     An ORI is conducted to evaluate and measure the ability of a unit to perform its wartime, contingency, or force sustainment missions.
     A UCI is conducted to assess areas mandated by law, as well as mission areas that are critical or important to the health and performance of an organization.
     To simplify things, think of things like this: a UCI is evaluating all the paperwork and processes that support both the peacetime and wartime missions, and an ORI is
an evaluation of how the wing performs those very same missions.
     There are basically two ways to look at a challenge like this. We either stand up and take it on, or we look the other way and "take things as they come."
     Well, you know how we will react.
     This is one of the few times we get to "strut our stuff" and show our leaders that we are the best wing in Air Force Space Command.
     Over the years, many of us have learned there are three key components to a successful inspection - leadership, teamwork, and attitude.
     When we speak of leadership, it's not just a Commander or Chief standing up and saying "follow me."
     It's our first line supervisors, the natural leaders who instinctively know when to lead from the front and when to blend into the middle of the pack and let the team run.
     Additionally, it takes a team to be truly successful in any inspection. We deliver our mission as a team so this should be natural for all of us.
     Finally, a positive attitude makes a real difference both in our preparation for inspections and when the inspectors "show up at the gate" to begin an ORI/UCI.
     My experience is a positive attitude is what separates the truly great organizations from the rest.
     As always, thanks for all you do. And what you will continue to do.
     It's an honor to serve with you.