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Energy Awareness: Small Changes, Big Difference

The Combined Federal Campaign, in its 50th year in 2011, has been extended one week, to Nov. 11. "This year is the 50th anniversary of the world's largest and most successful annual workplace charity campaign," said Maj. Shana Figueroa, 45th Space Wing CFC Project Officer. "Even the smallest donations can go a long way to help those who are in need; now, more than ever."

The Combined Federal Campaign, in its 50th year in 2011, has been extended one week, to Nov. 11. "This year is the 50th anniversary of the world's largest and most successful annual workplace charity campaign," said Maj. Shana Figueroa, 45th Space Wing CFC Project Officer. "Even the smallest donations can go a long way to help those who are in need; now, more than ever."

PATRICK AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. -- October is Energy Awareness Month. This year the Federal Energy Management Program encourages all agencies to turn words into actions and actions into results to
improve energy conservation and efficiency.

"Global Vigilance, Reach, and Power at home and abroad require vast amounts of energy - whether it is fuel for our aircraft, gas for our vehicles, or electricity for our space and cyberspace efforts," said Secretary of the Air Force Michael Donley and Air Force  Chief of Staff  Gen. Norton Schwartz in their energy awareness message.

Primarily due to its use of aviation fuel, the Air Force is the largest energy user in the  federal government. Because of this, it is vital that every person find a way to conserve  energy. Even a single percent decrease in consumption is significant.

We need to be smart about how we consume energy. Turn off lights in empty rooms,  drive smarter, and seek efficient alternatives. One small change can have a huge impact, and each small change adds up quickly.

In the past year, we have transitioned to more efficient light bulbs and equipment, where  possible, in all of our facilities. This is a great improvement, but to truly make a difference,  these choices must be made a habit.

Your basic habits - not things from which you would see an immediate benefit, but the small habit changes of your lifestyle - can make a big difference. There's a cause and effect. At first, it may take some constant thought and reminders, but eventually it should  become second nature.

The key in conserving energy is YOU. Your ideas and dedication will be what tips the  scale. Just as we have been asked to help find ways to work more efficiently, we are also charged to think hard about how we use energy.

Please make an extra effort at work and home to see where you can save energy.

Keep pushing, Sharks!